Tech companies oppose Texas abortion law

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A number of large tech companies are voicing their opposition to Texasnew abortion law with new policies and offers.

Several companies have taken action to limit whistleblowers of abortion or support women who wish to have an abortion in light of new law prohibiting women from having an abortion once a fetal heartbeat is detected around the sixth year. week of pregnancy.

Ridesharing apps Lyft and Uber, for example, announced new offers on Friday to cover legal fees for drivers if they are sued under new Texas law for driving women seeking abortions to clinics.

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Lyft co-founders Logan Green and John Zimmer, along with Lyft general counsel Kristin Sverchek, released a statement saying the law “threatens to punish drivers to get people where they need to go – in particular, women exercising their right to choose and access the health care they need. “

“We want to be clear: Drivers are never responsible for monitoring where their drivers are going or why,” Lyft executives said. “… This law is incompatible with fundamental human rights to privacy, our community guidelines, the spirit of carpooling and our values ​​as a company.”

Rideshare companies Uber and Lyft said on Friday, September 3, 2021 that they would cover legal costs for any driver sued under the new law banning most abortions in Texas. (AP Photo / Steven Senne, File)

Lyft’s new driver legal defense fund will cover “100%” of legal fees for drivers prosecuted under the law. The company is also donating $ 1 million to Planned Parenthood “to help ensure that transportation is never a barrier to accessing health care.”

Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi tweeted Friday in response to Lyft’s announcement that Uber is “too and will cover legal fees in the same way.”

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The GoDaddy web research platform on Friday suspended the service of an anti-abortion group’s website called Prolifewhistleblower.com, which allowed users to report violations of Texas’ restrictive abortion law.

The website created by Texas Right to Life allowed users to submit anonymous advice on suspected abortions. GoDaddy’s move came after the website faced intense criticism from pro-choice activists.

“We have informed prolifewhistleblower.com that they have 24 hours to switch to another vendor for violating our terms of service,” a representative from GoDaddy said in a statement obtained by Reuters and other opportunities.

Anti-abortion protesters wait in the Supreme Court for a decision on Monday, June 29, 2020 in Washington, on the Louisiana case, Russo v. June Medical Services LLC. (AP Photo / Patrick Semansky)

The company said ARS Technica that the website has “violated several provisions” of GoDaddy’s Terms of Service, including a provision prohibiting websites that collect “non-public or personally identifiable information” without consent.

Match Group, the parent company of dating app Tinder, and competing dating app Bumble, also took action on Thursday to support Texas employees seeking abortions out of state.

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Match Group said CEO Shar Dubey sent a note to employees on Thursday saying she was personally setting up a fund to help Texas-based Match employees access out-of-state abortion procedures.

“I immigrated to America from India over 25 years ago and have to say that as a resident of Texas I am shocked to now live in a state where female reproductive laws are over. regressive than most countries in the world, including India, ”Dubey said. said in the note.

Rival dating app Bumble also criticized the law and announced on Instagram it will provide funds to six organizations that support women’s reproductive rights.

Both dating companies are based in Texas and run by women.

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Meanwhile, other big companies that have spoken out on other Republican-led laws, like Texas’ new election law, have remained largely silent on Texas abortion law.

The measure, which also allows private Texas citizens to sue abortion providers and others suspected of assisting women with abortions for damages of up to $ 10,000, went into effect Wednesday. after the Supreme Court voted 5-4 to deny an effort by abortion providers to stop the measure from being enacted.

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The law provides some exceptions for medical emergencies, but none for victims of incest or rape.

Thomas Barrabi of Fox Business and The Associated Press contributed to this report.



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